How do you cross the oceans? We fly! Sure, we’re on a cycling trip. That will be our primary means of travel… but there will be times we might need to take trains or buses, or of course planes, to traverse certain areas or make it to certain places by a specified time.

Do you keep in touch? Absolutely! One of the primary ways we are staying in touch with folks is through this web site. However, we also still regularly check our email and facebook. We’re also available for phone conversation via Skype!

Where do you sleep? It depends on where we are. In North America and Europe, we focus mostly on free camping, and occasionally we pay for camp sites. We also use warmshowers.org a TON in these areas! In Central and South America and in Asia, we do more of a mix between free camping and cheap hotels or hostels. In those areas, we can often find a hotel room for as little as $5-7/night, which is usually worth it for us to get a shower!

(To Dave:) How did you talk your wife into this? That was unnecessary! Bethany thought it was a great idea from the first time Dave brought it up on our third date!

What do you do if you get sick? It depends on the severity of the sickness. There have been times when we were in bad shape in a remote area, and maybe we would arrange transport to the next real town, just in case we need real medical attention. But for the most part, the best treatment might be some medicine (we carry a first aid kit and several basic medications) and rest.

What do you do about food? We grocery shop as we go along. On a bike, you go far enough in a day that you usually pass through one or more cities or towns, so we typically just buy food each day or every few days.

How far do you go every day? Completely depends. Wind and terrain effect this significantly. A “normal” (decently flat, no crazy wind) good day would put us around 100 kilometers. There have been weeks where we averaged around 50 or 60 per day… there have been weeks where we average well over 100 every day. Our longest day was 162 kilometers (100 miles) in Vietnam.

Are you with anyone or a group? It’s just the two of us. We’re not going with an organized group. But we welcome people to come visit us somewhere or to join us for a short week or two of the journey! And of course we meet other cyclists along the way.

What are you doing with your house? We are renting it out… and are so blessed to be able to rent it out to friends who are trustworthy, faithful, and super clean! We’re grateful for God’s provision in this!

How can you afford this? Well, we planned and saved for this trip for a few years. Just ask our co-workers about our daily lunch regimen of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches! We also skimped on things that others might consider essentials, like cable TV or eating out regularly. All those small things really do matter! Also, cycle touring is one of the most inexpensive ways to travel, as we do a lot of camping and cooking our own food on the road.

How much does it cost? Well, that’s a tough question. It’s completely different for everyone who travels this way. When we planned our trip, we estimated a daily budget of about $50/day, which would include everything: food, lodging, health insurance, tourist outings, flights between, etc. We are currently over budget (which is why our trip will be closer to two years than two and a half) by about $10/day. There are a few factors that play into this, but among them are the unknowns of flight expenses (and how the baggage fees are always varying) and tourist outings. We’ve done more expensive side trips that we had initially planned–but we don’t regret that one bit!